Things to Consider When Hiring a Malpractice Attorney


Hospitals and other medical facilities are thought to be places of healing and helping, but like any other profession, medical professionals do make mistakes. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in the United States die every year from medical mistakes. Most of these mistakes can be prevented. It is important to know your rights in these situations. Malpractice legal help is usually needed if you or a loved one experience malpractice.

There are many advantages to hiring an attorney; they are experts in this field and can evaluate your case to ensure it is valid. A firm can also coordinate with your insurance company and gather evidence to ensure you have a strong case in court, or convince the medical facility to settle. It is important to remember that the laws covering malpractice are very complicated and medical professionals do have certain protections. This is why it's very important to hire an experienced and reputable firm.



Finding the Best Rated Malpractice Attorneys

When trying to find an attorney, search for best rated malpractice attorney firms in your area. Malpractice attorney firm fees will vary by location. Attorneys typically charge by the hour, flat rate, and contingency fee. Because of the enormous amount of labor, most firms charge by contingency. This means they take a percentage of the earnings a client is awarded in court or settlement. The standard amount for most locations is one third. For example, if you are awarded $3000, your attorney would earn $1000. There are also additional fees that you may be charged on top of the attorney fee.

These could include:

  • Mileage
  • Postage
  • Court
  • And copy fees.

Most firms will dismiss any charges if they lose the case. It is important to ask upfront how you will be charged and about any additional fees. The additional fees can sometimes surpass the attorney fee. It's also worth researching if you need a certain type of malpractice attorney. For example, hospital malpractice attorneys are probably the most common type. 

Hospital Malpractice Attorneys: Defending the Most Vulnerable

Hospitals can sometimes seem like large, faceless corporations, but it's important to remember that they are made up of people. Healthcare is a passion for the employees of hospitals at every level. However, people can also make mistakes. Unfortunately, when hospitals and their employees make mistakes, they can be at the cost of a patient's health. At such times, a hospital may be committing malpractice.

What Is Hospital Malpractice?

Hospital malpractice cases refer to negligence by a hospital resulting in loss of health, livelihood or even life itself. Many people think such an error must be extremely malicious to be considered malpractice, but this is not always the case. Even a mistake as simple as incorrectly dressing a wound may be malpractice if it leads to an infection in the patient. Hospitals are held to such high standards because the value of life and health is truly priceless.

For that reason, some common hospital malpractice claims involve the caregiver's level of competence: did the employee make a mistake they shouldn't have? Is the employee qualified? Did the hospital knowingly hire this person despite their lack of qualification? These are the type of questions a hospital malpractice attorney might attempt to resolve.

Hospital Malpractice Attorneys

Hospital malpractice attorneys are a diverse group of professionals. Some of them may exclusively handle hospital malpractice cases, while others may take on many different types of cases in their practice, yet they all have one common goal: to assist the patient. They are advocates for those who have been wronged when they were at their most vulnerable. Typically, hospital malpractice attorneys try to establish what went wrong, who in the hospital's chain of command is responsible, and how best to help the patient going forward. Whenever a hospital puts their own self-interest ahead of the patient's, an attorney will be there to help restore justice.